How To Dissolve Dog Poop In Your Yard (3 Ways To Do It!)

Having a furry canine companion is one of the best things on earth. Well, except for the mess they may leave in your yard. Whether it be vinegar or gardening lime, let's look at these three ways to dissolve dog poop on your lawn.

How To Dissolve Dog Poop In Your Yard

You might love Fido, but there’s something Fido loves more than you. Fido loves pooping all over your yard, and sometimes, he’s so active in that department that you just can’t pick up all the poop in your yard. It’s a nightmare, but there might be a shortcut when it comes to getting rid of dog poop in your yard. You might be able to dissolve it.

There are multiple ways that you can dissolve dog poop in your yard, each of which has its own perks and pitfalls. The most common methods include using:

  • Gardener’s lime
  • Vinegar
  • Enzyme-based dissolvers

Though most owners find that it’s easier on the lawn to just pick up the poop, there are still ways that you might be able to get some dissolving going on. This guide will help you understand how to make the most of your dissolving power and hopefully enjoy the rest of your day…away from having to think about poop.

Should You Dissolve Your Dog Poop?

I’ll be the first to admit that most homeowners would be better off just picking up their dogs’ poop and/or getting some professional lawn care to cover up the yellow spots that frequent poops can cause. A lot of the methods that are used to dissolve dog poop can have negative effects on lawns, not to mention your flowerbeds.

If you are seriously considering dissolving dog poop, do so for one of the following reasons:

  • You seriously neglected your lawn and now there are landmines everywhere. If it got to this level, you might have bigger problems than just dog poop. Even so, dissolving it all could be the fastest way to clean up your lawn and start to do damage control.
  • There are weather-related reasons why you can’t scoop the poop. If you are in an area where it’s constantly snowing, it may not actually be possible to scoop up everything and clean your yard. In this case, dissolving your dog poop might be the only way to make sure your yard looks okay come springtime.
  • The poop is stuck to something that can’t biodegrade. If you have an astroturf lawn (yes, they exist) then you will probably need to dissolve your dog poop instead of just scooping it up. This can become an issue related to sanitation more than aesthetics, depending on the make of your lawn.

How Long Does It Take For Dog Poop To Dissolve?

As much as the name suggests that you’ll see your dog poop dissolve in seconds, the reality is a little different. Dog poop naturally degrades and dissolves on its own, but the thing is, it can take a lot longer than you’d expect. Depending on the circumstances, it can take up to an entire year for dog poop to fully decompose.

When we’re talking about dissolving dog pop, what we’re saying is that it’ll dissolve faster. Using most of these methods, you can expect the poop to dissolve within two to six days. It’s not fast, so if you need to get rid of all the poop ASAP, you should just hire a professional pooper scooper or do it yourself. Besides, it’s better for your lawn anyway.

Video: Dissolving Dog Poop In Your Yard

If My Dog Poop Is Dissolving, Do I Still Need To Pick It Up?

Here’s the thing you need to be aware of: dog poop doesn’t entirely dissolve. It’ll have remnants. However, the remnants may be so small, you might not have to pick them up. It depends on the level of dissolution as well as the size of the turd itself. Use your own judgment here, and you should be alright.

Can You Compost Dog Poop?

If you are an environmentalist, then you’re probably wondering if there’s any way to make your dog’s poop a little more environmentally-friendly. Believe it or not, you can potentially compost your dog’s poop. However, there’s a caveat here. In order for your compost to avoid having parasites in it, you need to make sure that the compost’s heat is at least 140 degrees for three days straight.

Even then, the USDA still advises people against using compost made with dog poop for vegetable and fruit gardens. If you choose to go this route with your dung disposal, make sure that the compost you’re making is for landscaping only.

How To Dissolve Your Dog’s Poop From Your Lawn

Now that we’ve gone over the caveat, it’s best to take a look at each method you can use to disinfect and/or dissolve your dog’s poop. Let’s start.

Vinegar

Yes, vinegar does it all. It’s a deodorizer, a disinfectant, and also happens to be good at partially dissolving your dog’s poop. This is a gentle cleaner on furniture, but the thing is, it tends to be only partially effective when it comes to dissolving dog poop. This is a good cleaning agent for astroturf lawns, though, so if you need to remove poop from a faux lawn, this is your best option.

Vinegar tends to be a bad choice if you have a sensitive nose. After all, the stuff itself smells pretty foul. Also, it makes the poop mushy rather than dried out. So if you were hoping to just dry it out before you scoop it, then you should try another option.

Gardening Lime

Gardening lime, also known as agricultural lime, is extremely effective at dissolving dog poop off lawns. All you need to do is sprinkle it on the poop and you’ll see the poop vanish within a matter of days. It’s one of the most effective options out there, sure, but it comes with two major issues:

  • First, it’s extremely caustic. Getting lime on your hands can and will burn you. If you are going to go this route, you better make sure that you are equipped with gloves and that you do not breathe it in. Also, it may burn your dog if he gets directly in contact with it. So, make sure that your dog cannot come into direct contact with it.
  • Second, it can damage your lawn in large quantities. Agricultural lime is one of those things that can be extremely beneficial or burn holes in your lawn depending on the dose. If you want to play it safe, choose another option or limit your usage of it in areas with sensitive plant matter.

Enzyme-Based Dissolvers

Thankfully, there are a couple of companies out there that are working hard to make sure that your lawn stays pristine without hurting your dog. They make it happen by making enzyme-based dissolving solutions that are geared towards removing poop, urine odors, and other similar messes. Unlike other cleaners that rely on chemicals, these use biological agents to break down poop, pee, and other stuff.

There are several on the market that are worth a try, but the most popular one so far is Nature’s Pure Edge Yard Odor Eliminator. While it’s mostly meant for sucking the moisture out of poop and pee. Without the moisture that’s normally found in it, the feces can’t smell foul and it reduces by about 80 percent of its size. The end result? Basically no poop on your lawn.

The Odor Eliminator is currently the only product we’ve seen that’s able to act as a desiccant within two hours of use, almost entirely dissolving the poop in a flash. So, if you’re looking for a quick fix, this is it.

Related Questions

Can you flush eco-friendly dog poop bags?

While they may be biodegradable and eco-friendly, the poop bags you use should never be flushed down a toilet. If you prefer to flush your dog’s poop as a way of keeping things green, then scoop the poop out of the bag into the toilet and then recycle the bag. If you flush the bag, you will most likely cause a clog in your sewage line.

Are there any other ways I can avoid picking up my dog’s poop?

If you are not a fan of picking up dog poop and don’t want to potentially harm your lawn by using enzyme products, there’s another option. Most parts of the country have dog poop removal companies that will do the “heavy lifting” for you. You can look up dog waste removal companies online or just ask a neighborhood kid to do it for cash.

Is dog poop bad for your lawn?

While some types of poop can be beneficial for lawn health, dog poop is not one of them. Dog poop is unpleasant to step in, has a higher risk of parasites, doesn’t dissolve easily, and doesn’t contribute to the nutrition needs of grass. If left there long enough, having dog poop on your lawn will cause yellow patches to appear on your lawn.

Believe it or not, dog poop is considered to be an environmental hazard due to its propensity towards destroying plant life as well as its potential of carrying disease. It’s safe to say that dog poop is bad for your lawn and should be addressed immediately.

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Ossiana Tepfenhart

Ossiana Tepfenhart is an expert writer, focusing on interior design and general home tips. Writing is her life, and it's what she does best. Her interests include art and real estate investments.

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